Antibodies protect against wide range of influenza B virus strains

Researchers have identified two antibodies that protect mice against lethal infections of influenza B virus, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Together with an antibody that targets the other major kind of influenza viruses that infect people — influenza A — these […]

Immune system affects mind and body, study indicates

New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis helps illuminate a surprising mind-body connection. In mice, the researchers found that immune cells surrounding the brain produce a molecule that is then absorbed by neurons in the brain, where it appears to be necessary for normal behavior.

Study provides insight on how to build a better flu vaccine

Flu season comes around like clockwork every year, and sooner or later everyone gets infected. The annual flu shot is a key part of public health efforts to control the flu, but the vaccine’s effectiveness is notoriously poor, falling somewhere from 40% to 60% in a typical year.

Nasal vaccine against COVID-19 prevents infection in mice

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a vaccine that targets the SARS-CoV-2 virus, can be given in one dose via the nose and is effective in preventing infection in mice susceptible to the novel coronavirus. The investigators next plan to test the vaccine in nonhuman primates and humans to […]

New center to explore brain, immune system connections

As the brain reigns supreme over the human body, the immune system works 24/7 to defend the body from foreign invaders. For decades, however, the brain and the immune system were thought to operate independently of one another. But a growing body of evidence suggests the two are intimately connected in keeping the body healthy.

Immunotherapy-resistant cancers eliminated in mouse study

Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment by stimulating the patient’s own immune system to attack cancer cells, yielding remarkably quick and complete remission in some cases. But such drugs work for less than a quarter of patients because tumors are notoriously adept at evading immune assault.

COVID-19 mouse model will speed search for drugs, vaccines

The global effort to quickly develop drugs and vaccines for COVID-19 has been hampered by limited numbers of laboratory mice that are susceptible to infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report they have developed a mouse model of COVID-19 that replicates the […]

Gordon Lab Featured in Science Magazine

Work from the lab of Jeffery Gordon, MD was recently featured in Science as a runner up for Breakthrough of The Year. This title is awarded yearly by the journal Science to recognize significant discoveries or developments in scientific research. The journal highlighted work by Arjun Raman, MD, PhD (PGY3 Clinical Pathology Resident) and others […]

Clues to improve cancer immunotherapy revealed

Cancer immunotherapy drugs trigger the body’s immune system to attack tumors and have revolutionized the treatment of certain cancers, such as lymphoma, lung cancer and melanoma. Yet, while some patients respond well to the drugs, others don’t respond at all. Cancer immunologists want to change that.

Flu antibody protects against numerous and wide-ranging strains

Researchers have found an antibody that protects mice against a wide range of lethal influenza viruses, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, and Scripps Research in La Jolla, Calif. The antibody could serve as a template to […]

Colonna, Ley elected to National Academy of Sciences

Two physician-scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are among the 100 new members and 25 foreign associates elected to the National Academy of Sciences this year.

Trailblazer Award Brings Washington Univeristy Faculty Together

Eynav Klechevsky, assistant professor of pathology and immunology and Amit Pathak assistant professor of mechanical engineering & material science in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University were awarded a three-year, $610,000 Trailblazer Award, from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. This award provides funding to continue their […]

Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice

People with autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease, even though none of these conditions seem to target the cardiovascular system directly. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis believe they have begun to understand the link between the two.

Gordon receives British Royal Society’s highest honor

Jeffrey I. Gordon, MD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received the 2018 Copley Medal from the Royal Society in Britain. He is being honored for his studies of human gut microbial communities, which have led to a fundamental shift in the way scientists understand the relationship between microbes, health and […]

Grant Updates: March & April 2018

Nearly $3.9 million in grants awarded to faculty in Immunobiology and Laboratory & Genomic Medicine Carey-Ann Burnham, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pathology and Immunology, of Pediatrics, and of Molecular Microbiology, and Medical Director, Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, received a five-month $10,568 grant from the National Institutes of Health, entitled “A Cloud-Based WGS Platform for Routine Surveillance […]

Klein and Qavi receive LEAP Inventor Challenge awards

Two projects from Pathology & Immunology were selected this year to receive funding though the Leadership in Entrepreneurial Acceleration Program (LEAP). They include: Targeting type III interferon for the treatment of multiple sclerosis This project is a potential new biomarker of progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) that, when targeted, can prevent axonal injury and […]

Grant updates: September and October 2017

Nearly $8 million in grants awarded to faculty in Immunobiology and Laboratory & Genomic Medicine. Congratulations to all! Gautam Dantas, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology & Immunology, of Biomedical Engineering, and of Molecular Microbiology, received a three-year $1,143,750 award from the Department of Energy, entitled “Systems Engineering of Rhodococcus Opacus to Enable Production of Drop-in […]

Oltz appointed as editor-in-chief of The Journal of Immunology

The AAI Council announced that Eugene Oltz, PhD will serve a five-year term as the Journal’s editor-in-chief, starting July 1, 2018. Dr. Oltz is a Professor and Vice-Chair of Faculty Development in the Department of Pathology & Immunology.

Medical students honor faculty, residents

Crouch received Course Master of the Year from the class of 2019; Virgin, Edelson received Distinguished Service Awards. Congratulations to all!

Grant updates: July and August 2017

Multiple faculty and post-docs receive grants totaling nearly $8 million. Congratulations to all! Maxim Artyomov, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pathology & Immunology and of Biomedical Engineering, received a five-year $1,906,250 grant from the National Institutes of Health, entitled “Itaconate as Metabolic Regulator of Inflammation”. Takeshi Egawa, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology & Immunology, received […]

Pathology & Immunology United Way campaign kicks off 10/1

The Department of Pathology & Immunology United Way campaign will run from October 1st to October 31st. Faculty, staff and students can contribute through HRMS or through pledge cards throughout the campaign. To thank you for your participation, the department is sponsoring raffles and a cookie social. Don’t miss your chance to win a coffee […]

Employees encouraged to support the United Way campaign

Employees are encouraged to give their time and financial support to the annual United Way Campaign. Human Resources and the Gephardt Institute again are helping employees find volunteer opportunities in the St. Louis region.

Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells

New research from the School of Medicine and the University of California, San Diego, shows that Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells, the kind most resistant to standard treatments.

Oltz appointed as vice-chair for faculty development

This new position in the department is exclusively devoted to faculty development. The focus of the Vice-Chair will be mentoring faculty members at all levels – instructor through professor – and in all tracks – clinician, research and investigator. Initial emphasis will be on the department’s newer faculty members. The goal is to maximize the […]

Grant updates: May and June 2017

Virgin and Fremont receive $3.5 million for their work on norovirus. An additional $570K is awarded to Amarasinghe and Ellebedy in separate grants. Gaya Amarasinghe, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology & Immunology, of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, and of Molecular Microbiology, with Dr. Christopher Basler, PhD, Professor and Director, Center for Microbial Pathogenesis, Georgia Research Alliance […]

Protein-rich diet may help soothe inflamed gut

The study showing that mice fed tryptophan develop immune cells that foster a tolerant gut was a collaboration between Marco Colonna, MD and Jeffrey Gordon, MD of the department.

Grant updates: March and April 2017

Virgin receives nearly $7 million of a total of $7.8 million in grants awarded to numerous faculty in Immunobiology and Laboratory & Genomic Medicine. Congratulations to all! Gaya Amarasinghe, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology & Immunology, of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, and of Molecular Microbiology, received a one-year $122,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health, […]

Artyomov wins LEAP Innovator Challenge

The award was for work leading to a patent submission on the metabolic modulation of the immune response through the anti-inflammatory action of itaconate. LEAP funds provide winners with funds to help them achieve their milestones to further commercial licensing and/or investment potential. Awards were selected by the Skandalaris Center for Interdisciplinary Innovation and Entrepreneurship (SC), the Center for Drug […]

Department celebrates laboratory professional week

Medical Laboratory Professionals week was observed nationally the week of April 23-29, 2017. The Department of Pathology & Immunology took this opportunity to recognize the service and dedication of all individuals who contribute to the missions of the Department. Celebrations consisted of raffles, service awards, a photo contest, a luncheon and more. Download the newsletter for summaries of […]

Grant updates: January and February 2017

Grants totaling nearly $10 million were awarded to faculty and trainees in Immunobiology, Laboratory & Genomic Medicine and Anatomic & Molecular Pathology. Congratulations to all! Kyunghee Choi, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology & Immunology, received a four-year $1,856,628 grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, entitled “Hemangioblast Development and Regulation”. Marco Colonna, MD, Professor […]

Grant updates: November and December 2016

Nima Mosammaparast, Thaddeus Stappenbeck, Joshua Swamidass, Gene Oltz and Kathleen Sheehan among awardees in November and December with grants totaling nearly $3 million. Nima Mosammaparast, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pathology & Immunology, received a two-year $600,000 grant from the Alvin Siteman Cancer Research Fund, entitled “Targeting Nuclear Alkylation Repair Centers for Tumor Chemosensitization”. Thaddeus Stappenbeck, MD, […]

Randolph featured by Kenneth Rainin Foundation in video

Gwendolyn Randolph, PhD is featured in the Foundation’s “Researcher’s Breakthrough Moment” video series (February 9th edition). She is one of the Foundation’s grantees and the video highlights her visionary work on Chron’s Disease. Dr. Randolph is the Emil R. Unanue Professor of Pathology & Immunology and Head of the Division of Immunobiology. Visit the Kenneth Rainin Foundation Health […]

Oltz receives AAI distinguished service award

Dr. Eugene M. Oltz, PhD has been awarded the American Association of Immunologists Distinguished Service Award for outstanding service to the AAI and the immunology community. He has been valuable a member and chair of the AAI Publication Committee since 2012. The 2017 AAI award winners will be recognized at IMMUNOLOGY 2017™ – May 12-16, Washington, DC.