For some, GI tract may be vulnerable to COVID-19 infection

For some, GI tract may be vulnerable to COVID-19 infection

No evidence so far indicates that food or drinks can transmit the virus that causes COVID-19, but new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that people with problems in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract may be vulnerable to infection after swallowing the virus.
Bateman, Diamond, Hultgren named to National Academy of Inventors

Bateman, Diamond, Hultgren named to National Academy of Inventors

Neurologist Randall J. Bateman, MD, virologist and immunologist Michael S. Diamond, MD, PhD, and microbiologist Scott Hultgren, PhD – all faculty members at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis – have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors.
Faculty Member Featured in College of American Pathologists

Faculty Member Featured in College of American Pathologists

Melanie Yarbrough, PhD, was recently featured in CAP Today. The article focuses on Dr. Yarbrough’s work implementing a urine reflex algorithm to help increase the odds for success in reducing the number of urine cultures.  
Lethal brain infections in mice thwarted by decoy molecule

Lethal brain infections in mice thwarted by decoy molecule

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a molecule that protects mice from brain infections caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a mosquito-borne virus notorious for causing fast-spreading, deadly outbreaks in Mexico, Central America and northern South America. As the climate changes, the virus is likely to expand its […]
Study: Respiratory failure in COVID-19 usually not driven by cytokine storm

Study: Respiratory failure in COVID-19 usually not driven by cytokine storm

The turning point for people with COVID-19 typically comes in the second week of symptoms. As most people begin to recover, a few others find it increasingly difficult to breathe and wind up in the hospital. It has been theorized that those whose lungs begin to fail are victims of their own overactive immune systems.
Duncavage and Heusel to Lead Two New Department Sections

Duncavage and Heusel to Lead Two New Department Sections

In an effort to enhance clinical genomic services at Washington University School of Medicine, the Department of Pathology & Immunology is pleased to announce the formation of two new sections; Clinical Cancer Genomics and Constitutional Genomics. Eric Duncavage, MD will serve as the inaugural head of Clinical Cancer Genomics and Jonathon Heusel, MD, PhD will […]
Role of gut viruses in inflammatory bowel disease is focus of $8.5 million grant

Role of gut viruses in inflammatory bowel disease is focus of $8.5 million grant

The communities of bacteria that live in our digestive tracts help digest food and produce vitamins, protect against pathogens, and promote the healthy functioning of our immune system. But alongside gut bacteria thrives a vast community of viruses, and we know little about their impact on health and disease.
New discovery could help improve cancer vaccines

New discovery could help improve cancer vaccines

Cancer vaccines have shown promise in treating certain tumors, such as melanoma. But such vaccines have limitations. They often target normal proteins that may be more abundant in the tumor but also are present in healthy tissue, which can lead to off-target effects that cause autoimmune disorders and also reduce the effectiveness of the vaccines