Rooted in basic science research

Since its inception in 1910, the Department of Pathology & Immunology has had combined excellence in research, training, and clinical service. Our conviction that basic science research leads to exceptional training and high-quality clinical service has made our department a vital bridge between the basic sciences and other clinical disciplines at Washington University. We are a vital and ever-evolving group of scholars dedicated to human pathobiology and the care of those afflicted with disease.

Residents Receive Awards at Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists Meeting

Residents Receive Awards at Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists Meeting

Several residents and fellows recently attended the 54th annual Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists (ACLPS) meeting in Salt Lake City, UT. The meeting, held May 30-June 1, included cutting-edge Young Investigator presentations and an awards banquet. Residents from the Department of Pathology & Immunology presented a total of 12 talks and one poster.

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Awardees Announced for Trainee Research Day 2019

Awardees Announced for Trainee Research Day 2019

On Monday, the Department of Pathology & Immunology hosted its annual Trainee Research Day. The event celebrates research by residents and clinical fellows.

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Colonna, Ley elected to National Academy of Sciences

Colonna, Ley elected to National Academy of Sciences

Two physician-scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are among the 100 new members and 25 foreign associates elected to the National Academy of Sciences this year. Election to the academy — which was announced Tuesday, April 30 — is considered one of the highest honors that can be awarded to a U.S. scientist or engineer.

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Flaw in many home pregnancy tests can return false negative results

Flaw in many home pregnancy tests can return false negative results

Each year, women in the U.S. rely on some 20 million home pregnancy tests to learn potentially life-altering news. Despite marketing claims that such tests are 99 percent accurate, research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis over the past decade has shown that up to 5 percent of pregnancy tests return results indicating a woman is not pregnant when, in reality, she is.

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