Role of gut viruses in inflammatory bowel disease is focus of $8.5 million grant

The communities of bacteria that live in our digestive tracts help digest food and produce vitamins, protect against pathogens, and promote the healthy functioning of our immune system. But alongside gut bacteria thrives a vast community of viruses, and we know little about their impact on health and disease.

New discovery could help improve cancer vaccines

Cancer vaccines have shown promise in treating certain tumors, such as melanoma. But such vaccines have limitations. They often target normal proteins that may be more abundant in the tumor but also are present in healthy tissue, which can lead to off-target effects that cause autoimmune disorders and also reduce the effectiveness of the vaccines

Welcome New Trainees Starting July 2020

Pathology & Immunology is excited and proud to welcome the newest members of our department. These new residents and fellows will begin the next chapter of their medical education journey this July. To see a list of all the new trainees click here.

Brunt receives award from liver pathology society

Elizabeth M. Brunt, MD, a professor emeritus of pathology and immunology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received a Lifetime Achievement Award for Contributions to Liver Pathology from the Hans Popper Hepatopathology Society.

Gronowski given clinical chemistry award

Recognized for contributions to reproductive medicine diagnostics Ann M. Gronowski, PhD, a professor and vice-chair of faculty affairs and development in the Department of Pathology and Immunology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received the Academy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Clinical Chemistry in a Selected Area of Research from the […]

School of Medicine physicians, researchers tackle coronavirus

Clinical teams ready; research for vaccines, drugs underway Soon after a novel coronavirus first appeared in China in late 2019, researchers, doctors and staff at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis began preparing for the possibility of an outbreak. Infectious disease physicians started planning how to respond if a person with suspected exposure […]

Brian T. Edelson honored for His Dedication to Teaching Immunology

Brian T. Edelson

Brian T. Edelson, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and immunology, was presented with the Samuel R. Goldstein Leadership Award in Medical Student Education award.  Edelson has also received four Distinguished Service Teaching awards from Washington University and awards from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and the Edward Mallinckrodt, Jr. Foundation. Recognizing outstanding teaching, the Samuel […]

Ann Gronowski Recognized by AACC

Ann Gronowski has been selected as the 2020 AACC Academy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Clinical Chemistry in a Selected Area of Research. This award recognizes especially meritorious research contributions by an individual in a specific area of clinical chemistry. The clinical chemists who have received this award have achieved national and international status for […]

Grants & Notables Update: November and December 2018

Over $4.5 million in grants awarded to faculty in Pathology & Immunology Paul Allen, PhD, Robert L. Croc Professor of Pathology and Immunology and Interim Division Chief, Immunology, received a two-year $502,139 grant from National Institutes of Health / National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, entitled “Immune Regulation by Bacteroides Polysaccharide Capsules”. Ali Ellebedy, […]

Grant Updates and Notables – September & October 2018

Close to $9 million in grants awarded to faculty in Pathology & Immunology Gautam Dantas, PhD, Professor of Pathology and Immunology, of Biomedical Engineering, and of Molecular Microbiology, received a one-year $486,849 contract from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) entitled “Impact of Early Life Antibiotic Treatment in Preterm Infants on Subsequent MDRO Colonization […]

Viruses in blood lead to digestive problems

While studying viruses best known for infecting the brain, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis stumbled upon clues to a conundrum involving a completely different part of the anatomy: the bowel, and why some people possibly develop digestive problems seemingly out of the blue.

Gordon receives Luminary Award

Jeffrey I. Gordon, MD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received a 2018 Luminary Award from the Precision Medicine World Conference. He is being honored for his pioneering work in founding the field of gut microbiome research and for fundamentally altering the understanding of the origins of human health and disease, especially as […]